Hiking to the Three Sharp Summits in Hong Kong (II) - Photo Trip at Castle Peak

Hiking to the Three Sharp Summits in Hong Kong (II) - Photo Trip at Castle Peak

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Hiking to the Three Sharp Summits in Hong Kong (II) - Photo Trip at Castle Peak

Castle Peak, at altitude of 583m, is located in the west of Tuen Mun in the New Territories. It is known as one of the three sharp summits in Hong Kong because of its precipitous slopes. Views of Tuen Mun, Yuen Long Pak Nai can be seen from the summit, and even the airport and the Shenzhen Deep Bay are within sight on a clear day. Offering almost 360 degrees of stunning scenery, it is a destination not to be missed by photo lovers. This is a challenging and physically demanding trail with steep slopes, so be sure to be well prepared and stock up with food and water before you go.
The quickest and most convenient way to get to the peak is to start from Tsing Shan Tsuen Light Rail Station and pass through Tsing Shan Monastery. If you just want to take photos, head directly to the flat land on the summit and take the same route back. If you want to trek more, continue on the trail to the direction of Pak Nai and get back to town by minibus at Pak Nai, or descend to Leung King Estate in Tuen Mun at the halfway of the trail. The round trip journey from Tsing Shan Tsuen Light Rail Station to the summit will take around 2 hours; 3 hours if exit at Leung King Estate and 4.5 hours if exit at Pak Nai (check the minibus schedule beforehand). Whichever route you take, remember to stock up with enough food and water and bring a lighting equipment if you plan to stay till sunset as there is no street light along the way downhill.

This article will show you the route that starts from Tsing Shan Tsuen Light Rail Station and exits at Leung King Estate.
After getting off at Tsing Shan Tsuen Light Rail Station, head towards YKK building (the building in red and grey)
Turn into Hing Choi Street
Walk till the end of the road and turn left to Tsing Shan Monastery
Walk uphill here when you see this monumental archway
Turn right at this junction to Tsing Shan Monastery if you have time. This time we turn left (follow the yellow railings) and take the stairs up to the summit
You will reach a pavilion shortly
Follow the path with the rubbish bin
Take the right path at this junction
Take the left path at this junction
You are very close to the summit when you see this white signal tower
At Castle Peak, you will see a white signal tower and a protruding giant rock. Under this rock there is a path leading to a large flat land, which offers spectacular wide-open views and more shooting space. After shooting, you can follow the same route to get back downhill.
Castle Peak Hinterland
The Shenzhen Deep Bay and the oyster field near Pak Nai
Gold Coast
Tuen Mun, Tin Shui Wai and Yuen Long
Continue on this path next to the green construction to exit at Pak Nai or Leung King Estate
After passing the green construction, you will see this trigonometric station
Looking back to the summit of Castle Peak
There are a couple of paths to choose from at this point. Since the Castle Peak Hinderland is an infertile area, the paths are obvious and easy to follow. You can choose any of these to get to Pak Nai and Leung King Estate as long as the paths are going to the right direction. Just pick one that is easy to walk (with gentler slopes). Be careful when you go downhill as these paths on the Castle Peak Hinderland are covered with sands and gravels.
You can see the paths very clearly
The Shenzhen Deep Bay covered in heavy smog
Peaks in the Tai Lam Country Park
Descend at the red spot to reach Leung King Estate which is at the foot of the hill, or continue on the trail to go to Pak Nai
A closer look
The sharp pillar at the upper part of the photo is the white signal tower at Castle Peak. This photo shows how far we go
Go downhill along the traffic road
After a day of shooting, get some rest and refresh yourself at the shopping mall in Leung King Estate and take bus to leave.
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